Maintaining Motivation

Thanks to stumbling across Ali’s Facebook post on signing up for ORAMM without a year of intention, I decided to ask another friend about ORAMM and had she done it. “Three times.” Wondering how it was as a “race” – I use that term loosely because there is no race pace on 60 miles and 10,000+ feet of climbing if you don’t train for awhile – and her response, “Let’s go do ORAMM together.”

Yes, let’s.

I have not ridden my mountain bike this year as much as years past. I think Black Betty only has 450 miles or so on her. That’s way behind the usual mileage I would have accumulated since her joining my small steed of bicycles last year. She rides smooth though. I had a 45-minute zone 1 recovery ride (I am the worst at these) last week and decided rather than spin around at zone 1 on the trainer while reading a book, I’d take BB to the woods and zone 1 there looking at stuff in the woods. I ended up deciding pretty quickly into the ride that I wanted to fly. Surely 45 minutes flying wouldn’t hurt me that much, and thus is the reason why I am the worst at zone 1 recovery rides. Zone 1 seems a better fit for off the bike and in the bed with a pint of ice cream OR riding as hard as you can for 45 minutes. It is hard to find the in-between for me and will always be the hardest ride. Most of those are either not done at all, or overcooked to not-perfection.

I haven’t signed up for ORAMM yet because I’m waiting on a transfer ticket cheaper. I figure I can save some money that way. I suppose sometime in the next 4 weeks I will need to put some miles on BB. I don’t mind as long as they are fast miles. Ha!

From their website, I love the wordage:

Do not underestimate the extreme difficulty and danger of this event. The course is extremely demanding and travels over rugged terrain with extreme elevation changes. The forest remains in its natural habitat. It is not uncommon to see wildlife such as a wild cat or a black bear. Be ready to cope with any circumstances!! Please note that firearms are not permitted in certain areas. Aid stations will help with safety matters, but it is the competitor’s ultimate responsibility to insure his or her own safety. A few course-related facts: the 63 mile course record was set in 2014 by pro rider Thomas Turner, who finished in 4 hours 23 minutes. One rider completed the course with only one month of riding under his belt, however this rider quit riding altogether after the race! Others too have retired their biking efforts after competing in this race. This is not your typical race. Regardless of how you finish, you will have competed in the most exciting mountain bike race in the entire Southeast!!!

Perhaps this is the race (ride) that will cause me to hang up my bike forever. It’s the risk I’m willing to take! I just wonder if I should go get a 28 or 30 on the front before this hellacious event. I do think it will shock me back into climbing a little. I feel like I haven’t been climbing like I used to before I had a regimented plan. I guess you can’t train time trial, sprinting, short efforts, and climbing all in the same season effectively on the amount of time I have available to train. That’s the hardest part for me… feeling like I’m losing in an area because I don’t have time to focus on it. Here’s a good 7-9 hour focus on the climb right here. I have no idea how it’s going to go and if it’ll just be a suffer fest from the start, but I do know two good friends going up there, and maybe somehow we will suffer together. I haven’t done a mountain bike race more than 50 miles (Fools Gold, and 5 Points 50) it wasn’t so bad. I wasn’t in that great of shape either.

I get a little bit lost when I don’t have something big in front of me and lose a little motivation. Yes, Oak Ridge and River Gorge are big, but I’ve done both. Maybe it’s that I need something in front of me that I haven’t done before to inspire the same dedication to training and outlook. I hope to have good (very decent) results at Oak Ridge and River Gorge, but my strengths don’t really play up to either very well quite yet, especially in River Gorge. I still have memories from last year’s climb at the end and how I was thinking about being in labor and what I had to do to deal with that pain. Same situation. Uncomfortable and unrelenting. Now if I could shave off just 5-10 lbs before August, that would be gold.

Speaking of which, what’s for breakfast?